Acts 16:12
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
and from there to Philippi, which is a leading city of the district of Macedonia and a Roman colony. We remained in this city some days.

King James Bible
And from thence to Philippi, which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia, and a colony: and we were in that city abiding certain days.

American Standard Version
and from thence to Philippi, which is a city of Macedonia, the first of the district, a Roman colony: and we were in this city tarrying certain days.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And from thence to Philippi, which is the chief city of part of Macedonia, a colony. And we were in this city some days conferring together.

English Revised Version
and from thence to Philippi, which is a city of Macedonia, the first of the district, a Roman colony: and we were in this city tarrying certain days.

Webster's Bible Translation
And from thence to Philippi, which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia, and a colony: and we were in that city abiding certain days.

Weymouth New Testament
and thence to Philippi, which is a city in Macedonia, the first in its district, a Roman colony. And there we stayed some little time.

Acts 16:12 Parallel
Commentary
Vincent's Word Studies

Chief (πρώτη)

Some explain, the first city to which they came in Macedonia.

A colony (κολωνία)

Roman towns were of two classes: municipia, or free towns, and colonies. The distinction, however, was not sharply maintained, so that, in some cases, we find the same town bearing both names. The two names involved no difference of right or of privilege. The historical difference between a colony and a free town is, that the free towns were taken into the state from without, while the colonies were offshoots from within. "The municipal cities insensibly equalled the rank and splendor of the colonies; and in the reign of Hadrian it was disputed which was the preferable condition, of those societies which had issued from, or those which had been received into, the bosom of Rome" (Gibbon, "Decline and Fall").

The colony was used for three different purposes in the course of Roman history: as a fortified outpost in a conquered country; as a means of providing for the poor of Rome; and as a settlement for veterans who had served their time. It is with the third class, established by Augustus, that we have to do here. The Romans divided mankind into citizens and strangers. An inhabitant of Italy was a citizen; an inhabitant of any other part of the empire was a peregrinus, or stranger. The colonial policy abolished this distinction so far as privileges were concerned. The idea of a colony was, that it was another Rome transferred to the soil of another country. In his establishment of colonies, Augustus, in some instances, expelled the existing inhabitants and founded entirely new towns with his colonists; in others, he merely added his settlers to the existing population of the town then receiving the rank and title of a colony. In some instances a place received these without receiving any new citizens at all. Both classes of citizens were in possession of the same privileges, the principal of which were, exemption from scourging, freedom from arrest, except in extreme cases, and, in all cases, the right of appeal from the magistrate to the emperor. The names of the colonists were still enrolled in one of the Roman tribes. The traveller heard the Latin language and was amenable to the Roman law. The coinage of the city had Latin inscriptions. The affairs of the colony were regulated by their own magistrates, named Duumviri, who took pride in calling themselves by the Roman title of praetors (see on Acts 16:20).

Acts 16:12 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Philippi.

Acts 20:6 And we sailed away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread, and came to them to Troas in five days...

Philippians 1:1 Paul and Timotheus, the servants of Jesus Christ, to all the saints in Christ Jesus which are at Philippi...

1 Thessalonians 2:2 But even after that we had suffered before, and were shamefully entreated, as you know, at Philippi...

the chief. or, the first. a colony.

Acts 16:21 And teach customs, which are not lawful for us to receive, neither to observe, being Romans.

Cross References
Acts 16:9
And a vision appeared to Paul in the night: a man of Macedonia was standing there, urging him and saying, "Come over to Macedonia and help us."

Acts 16:10
And when Paul had seen the vision, immediately we sought to go on into Macedonia, concluding that God had called us to preach the gospel to them.

Acts 16:21
They advocate customs that are not lawful for us as Romans to accept or practice."

Acts 18:5
When Silas and Timothy arrived from Macedonia, Paul was occupied with the word, testifying to the Jews that the Christ was Jesus.

Acts 19:21
Now after these events Paul resolved in the Spirit to pass through Macedonia and Achaia and go to Jerusalem, saying, "After I have been there, I must also see Rome."

Acts 19:29
So the city was filled with the confusion, and they rushed together into the theater, dragging with them Gaius and Aristarchus, Macedonians who were Paul's companions in travel.

Acts 20:1
After the uproar ceased, Paul sent for the disciples, and after encouraging them, he said farewell and departed for Macedonia.

Jump to Previous
Abiding Chief City District First Foremost Important Little Macedonia Macedo'nia Part Philippi Philip'pi Principal Roman Several Staying Tarrying Thence Time
Jump to Next
Abiding Chief City District First Foremost Important Little Macedonia Macedo'nia Part Philippi Philip'pi Principal Roman Several Staying Tarrying Thence Time
Links
Acts 16:12 NIV
Acts 16:12 NLT
Acts 16:12 ESV
Acts 16:12 NASB
Acts 16:12 KJV

Acts 16:12 Bible Apps
Acts 16:12 Biblia Paralela
Acts 16:12 Chinese Bible
Acts 16:12 French Bible
Acts 16:12 German Bible

Bible Hub

ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
Acts 16:11
Top of Page
Top of Page







电竞下注